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December 12, 2019

Over 200-million-year-old dinosaur fossil found in Lashio

 

The discovery of a dinosaur fossil, estimated to be over 200 million years old, in 2018 at the Yebawhaung mountain in the west of Lashio Town, northern Shan State, shows dinosaurs and extinct reptiles once lived in Myanmar, as per research conducted at the Yadanabon University.

Fossil of dinosaur discovered in Lashio.  Photo: Min Htet Aung (Mandalay sub-printing house)

“The fossil was discovered by the Department of Geology, Yadanabon University, in 2018 and it is believed to belong to an extinct reptile Pachypleurosaur, which resembled lizards.
The fossil is estimated to be 210-230 million years old. They were elongate animals, ranging from 20 cm to about a metre in length, with small heads and long necks.
They ate fish,” said Dr Maung Maung Naing, the Rector of the Yadanabon University.
“This is the first time that an over 200 million years old dinosaur fossil has been discovered in Myanmar. It is a milestone for Myanmar’s geology. The discovery has proved that dinosaurs and extinct reptiles roamed in Myanmar.
More research studies will be carried out in cooperation with foreign geologists,” he said.
The discovery of the fossil has been published in the Acta Palaeontologica Polonica journal, in cooperation with experts from the University of Edinburgh, the UK, said Dr Khaing Khaing San, the Professor of the Geology Department, Yadanabon University, who found and wrote research paper of the fossil.
“That Pachypleurosaur was mostly found in the Yunnan and Quanzhou provinces of China and Europe.
The discovery of the fossil helps contribute to learning. It brings potential for further discovery as well,” she added.
The origins of the fossil have been identified. However, further studies for scientific classification of the fossil and more discovery tours are being planned. —Min Htet Aung (Mandalay sub-printing house)
(Translated by Ei Myat Mon)

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