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December 12, 2019

Japanese Encephalitis vaccinations continue in rural areas of N Rakhine

A child in a rural area of Rakhine State is vaccinated by a nurse who is part of a mobile team administering vaccinations nationwide.  Photo: Phoe Htaung
A child in a rural area of Rakhine State is vaccinated by a nurse who is part of a mobile team administering vaccinations nationwide.  Photo: Phoe Htaung

Children in far-flung, difficult-to-access areas in northern Rakhine State have been given Japanese Encephalitis vaccinations since 20 November as the government continues its nationwide vaccination campaign.
Children from four village-tracts, including Saidin Pyaing Chaung Village located about 13 miles from Buthidaung and not easily accessible, were given vaccinations.
“We have to take our security following the safety first guidelines to reach this village because this village is not easily accessible,” said Deputy Director Dr Than Tun Kyaw of Buthidaung Township Public Health Department. Dr. Than Tun Kyaw is the leader of the mobile team which vaccinated the children from Sai Din Pyaing Chaung Village included in the four village-tracts in Buthidaung Township.

The nationwide seven-day campaign is targeted to end on 21 November.
The Ministry of Health and Sports launched the vaccination programme for children under the age of 15 yesterday in Maungtaw Township, Rakhine State.
The medical officer of Maungtaw Township, Dr. Kyaw Maung Maung Thein, said this was the first step in a nationwide effort to control encephalitis, an incurable viral disease that affects children more severely.
”The intention of the vaccination is to control the spread of Japanese encephalitis, especially for children under 15. We vaccinate mainly children from 9 months to 15 years of age.
This campaign is not only for Maungtaw Township, but for the whole country also.”
The disease is spread through mosquito bites, and the potentially fatal virus can harm the brain and cause irreversible neurological damage.
The vaccination can protect 85 to 100 per cent of children from Japanese encephalitis, it is learnt from the staff of the health department. —News Team

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