September 08, 2016

Young but able

Former UN chief Kofi Annan once expressed his stronger recognition for the importance of youth empowerment for development, saying that “any society that does not succeed in tapping into the energy and creativity of its youth will be left behind.” True to his words, unemployment and underemployment, especially among young people, spell the twin problems of fighting poverty and enhancing shared prosperity.
It is understandable that the fight against poverty is the toughest match for all policy makers and decision makers to play in transforming the country into a dynamic and vibrant economy. And that move can safely be interpreted as a history-changing initiative to bring the dynamics of youth employment through empowerment.
With social media penetrating into our everyday life, young people from different religious and social backgrounds have bigger dreams and aspirations to follow. They all need secure jobs to put their dreams into reality. In addition, they are willing to move to action by putting their skills and resources to the career of their choice.    We have witnessed an awful nuisance longing for genuine super heroes with the capacity to steer the country back on track in terms of development. To avoid the recurrence of such a similar fate in the future, the government should heighten the economic aspirations and resources of the younger generation by addressing the mismatches between education and expertise, which are leading causes that drive even educated young people out of work.


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