September 14, 2016

Why not buy into her reform initiatives?

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi deserves a special mention for all the sacrifices she has made to drive democratic reform in the political arena as the leader of the most popular political party in the country, let alone what she is doing in her capacity as State Counsellor to secure political reform and enhance national reconciliation.
She spent much of her productive time under house arrest for over 20 years because of her endeavours to enable the people to enjoy democratic rights, braving the painful days of being separated from her spouse and two sons. Her selfless dedication to democracy earned her the Nobel Peace Prize, with the international community regarding her as “an international symbol of peaceful resistance in the face of oppression” and “an outstanding example of the power of the powerless”.
Recently, she appointed former UN chief Kofi Annan as the leader of the Advisory Committee for Rakhine State and entrusted him with the task of finding ways to smooth the path to peaceful coexistence between the Buddhist and Muslim communities in the western part of the country. After meeting the leaders of the two communities in Rakhine State, the former UN secretary general gave press conferences in which he promised that his commission would stay impartial in its mission and reaffirmed that they would not interfere with the country’s own affairs but provide advice and suggestions in a report they would compile in a year. Even at this momentous event, her farsighted decision sparked a storm of protest, but only in two of all the states and regions.
Despite some severe
criticism, her natural charm and charisma shine through
her contagious courage at home and abroad, a factor that led to a majority support and a major shift from military rule to a more civilian, democratic government. It is, therefore, absolutely vital for us to continue to support the government’s reforms and commit ourselves to turning our country into a more peaceful, stable, prosperous democracy.


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