August 18, 2016

Time for reflection about effective teaching

Acquisition of quality education is everyone’s dream, which is why the debate on the educational reform has recently attracted more public attention. It is not hard to understand that the standard of education determines the fate of a country. What really matters most is to learn the lessons from the success stories of other countries. It is found that academically successful countries encourage teachers not only to concentrate on education but also to work with each other for self-improvement and self-reflection.
In the teaching-learning process in any given education system, improvement is unthinkable if teachers fail to evaluate and assess their classroom practices.
It is therefore absolutely vital for teachers to reflect on their past and present experience so as to introduce better practices of classroom management in the future. Unfortunately, most teachers in our country remain stuck in daily teaching routines, without noticing that they are becoming fossilised because they have stopped learning from their teaching. Some teachers defend themselves and their actions by saying that the repetition of the same classroom activities is typical of the country’s education system.
Penny Ur once commented on teacher behaviour that “teachers who have been teaching for twenty years may be divided into two categories: those with twenty years’ experience and those with one year’s experience repeated twenty times.” This highlights the difference between ‘fossilised teaching routines’ and ‘innovative teaching practices’.
It is incumbent on teachers to break this vicious spiral of their automatic and routine teaching behaviour and start to reflect on their teaching experience.


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