September 26, 2017

The Sacred Museum of the Sixth Great Buddhist Council

Ba Sein (Religious Affairs)

With a view to perpetuating and propagating the Theravada Buddhism, a Sacred Museum commemorating the Sixth Great Buddhist Council of 1954 has been already built with support of multifarious Buddhist people and the government of the State Peace and Development Council of the Union of Myanmar in the year 2000. The Sacred Museum is grandly situated on Sirimangala Kaba Aye Hillock close to the east of the Mahapasana Cave (Great Cave) in which the Sixth Great Buddhist Council was successfully held in the year 2498 of the Buddhist Era. 1954 AD. The Sixth Great Buddhist Council was attended by an assembly of (2500) venerable elders (Bhikkhus) and heads of states from five Theravada Buddhist nations, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos. Sri Lanka and Myanmar. At the Sixth Great Buddhist Council, an assembly of (2500) venerable elders (Bhikkhus) led by the most Venerable Revata recited and verified the scriptures which were later put into print.
We all Buddhists throughout the world know that altogether Six Great Buddhist Councils were held in order to recite and give authenticity of the whole body of the teachings of the Omniscient Buddha and to preserve and propagate those sacred teachings after the noble demise of the Omniscient Buddha in 544 BC.
Just three months and four days (in 544 BC) after the noble demise of the Omniscient Buddha, the First Great Buddhist Council were held in the city of Rajagaha (India). The whole body of the teachings of the Omniscient Buddha was recited and given authenticity by an assembly of five hundred Arahats presided over by the Venerable Mahakassapa at the First Great Buddhist Council which was held with the support of King Ajatasattu.
In the year (100) of the Buddhist Era, 443 BC, the Second Great Buddhist Council was held in the city of Vesali (India). The ten indulgences that a sect of heretical monks were trying to add to the original teachings of the Omniscient Buddha were dismissed by an assembly of seven hundred Arahats led by the Venerable Yasa at the Second Great Buddhist Council which was held with support of King Kalasoka.
In the year (235) of the Buddhist Era, 308 BC, the Third Great Buddhist Council was held in the city of Pataliputta (India). The doctrines of unlawful extraneous elements that some had tried to insinuate into it were cleared by an assembly of one thousand Arahats headed by the Venerable Mahamoggaliputtatissa at the Third Great Buddhist Council which was held with the support of Emperor Asoka.
In the year (450) of the Buddhist Era, the Fourth Great Buddhist Council was held in Ma-laya, Sri Lanka (Ceylon). An assembly of five hundred venerable elders (Bhikkhus) led by the Venerable Mahadhammarakkhita wrote the entire words of the Omniscient Buddha’s teachings on palm leaves at the Fourth Great Buddhist Council The Fourth Great Buddhist Council was held with the supporfof King Vattagamini of Ceylon.
In the year (2415) of the Buddhist Era, 1871 AD, the Fifth Great Buddhist Council was held in Mandalay, Myanmar. An assembly of two thousand and four hundred venerable elders (Bhikkhus) led the Venerable Jagarabhivamsa recited and app’roved the scriptures at the Fifth Great Buddhist Council, and then the scriptures were inscribed on 729 stone slabs. The Fifth Great Buddhist Council was held with the support of His Majesty, King Mindon of Myanmar.
The Sixth Great Buddhist Council
In the year 2498 of the Buddhist Era, 1954 CE, the Sixth Great Buddhist Council was held in the Mahapasana Cave (Great Cave) on the Sirimangala Kaba Aye Hillock, Yangon, Myanmar. The Sixth Great Buddhist Council had the collaboiation and participation of the learned monks (Mathatheras) from Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, India and Pakistan. Five hundred Buddhist monks in Myanmar who were well-versed in the study and practice of the teachings of the Buddha took the responsibility of re-examining the Texts. The Sixth Great Buddhist Council was held by an assembly of twenty-five thousand venerable elders from five Theravada Buddhist nations (Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Sri Lanka and Myanmar) led by Adhidhajamaharatthaguru. Nyaungyan Sayadaw, the Most Venerable Bhaddanta Revata to recite and verify the scriptures (Pali texts, Athakatha and Tika) which were later put into print.
Aggamahapandita Mahasi Sayadaw, the Most Venerable Bhaddanta Sobhana acted as questioner and Tipitakadharadhammabhandagarika, Mingun Sayadaw, the Most Venerable Bhauddanta Viccitasarabhivamsa as an examiner on recitation and verification of the scriptures at the Sixth Great Buddhist Council from the very beginning to the end. The Sixth Great Buddhist Council lasted two years from 2498 to 2500 Buddhist Era, (1954 to 1956 CE).
The Sixth Great Buddhist Council was held with the support of generous Buddhist peoples and the Five Theravada Buddhist nations, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos and other 25 nations.
The Thereavada Buddhism consists of Tripitaka canons and five Nikaya treatises which have been verified and approved by the Six Great Buddhist Councils which were successfully held by the successive Mahatheras after the noble demise of the Omniscient Buddha over 2560 years ago.
The Sacred Museum of the Sixth Great Buddhist Council
Members of Sangha, Buddhist people and successive Governments of the Union of Myanmar realized that a Sacred Museum commemorating the Sixth Grat Buddhist Council should be established in which the significant and remarkable records, artifacts, religious objects. photographs, pictures and others related to the Sixth Great Buddhist Council are to be preserved and displayed at this Sacred Museum. According to the strong wish of members of Sangha, Buddhist people and successive Governments of the Union of Myanmar, the Sacred Museum commemorating the Sixth Great Buddhist Council of 1954, has been successfully already built. This Sacred Museum will stand forever as a significant and sacred symbol of Theravada Buddhism in the world so long as the Buddha Sasana exists.
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