August 19, 2016

The interface between unemployment and incapacity

It is safe to assume that an epoch of massive migration has started in our country over the past 25 years. Since the 1990s, internal migration has grown dramatically, with a large number of young people migrating from rural to urban areas in search of work and some to foreign countries. Their main destinations include Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan and some countries like Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.
Leaving the country in search of better job opportunities in an alien place is not an easy decision to make.
In addition, migration is not without reasons and risks. Migration agents and labour brokers organise the recruitment of migrant workers, most of whom belong to an unskilled workforce.
The news of smuggling and trafficking of people frequently hit the headlines.
Despite their plan for temporary migration, most people end up in a long stay for various reasons. No doubt, highly skilled workers will be among them. Nevertheless, this brain drain can be interpreted as a serious loss of human capital for our country, thereby triggering a major obstacle to national development. Nobody in their right minds would ever think of leaving a country where a quality of life with job security is guaranteed.
More often than not, lack of job opportunity is blamed for unemployment. On the other hand, it is often found that young people out of work lack the skills the employers are looking for. It will be better if the government pays undivided attention to the effort to close the gap between unemployment and incapacity.


Related posts

Translate »