August 19, 2016

Police need reliable info to act on car thefts: deputy minister

Police cannot take action over the alleged sale of stolen auto parts unless victims come forward and file reports with the authorities, Deputy Minister for Transport U Han Sein said Monday at the Amyotha Hluttaw. The deputy minister was responding to reports that 90 percent of auto parts for sale at a tax-free market in Tamway were stolen from ports. The police and the Myanma Port Authority need victims to provide information before they can take action, the deputy minister said. Port authorities and shipping lines must be accountable for loss of auto parts, while agents must only accept vehicles after matching them with inspection sheets, the deputy minister advised. The deputy minister blamed some agents for auto part thefts, saying there were a number who forgot vehicles outside ports. The deputy minister said vehicle importers can apply to recoup their losses by providing firm evidence. The Ministry of Religious Affairs is providing cash assistance to teachers at monastic education schools, but there is no plan to increase the amount at the moment, Deputy Minister for Religious Affairs Dr Maung Maung Htay said at the Upper House session.
The ministry is providing K36,000 per month to primary school teachers, K41,000 per month to middle school teachers and K45,000 per month to high school teachers, according to the deputy minister. The government is spending K3.475 billion on 7,584 monastic education teachers this academic year, he said.  The Amyotha Hluttaw session on Monday passed seven bills and approved one motion to reduce the amount of advertisements for liquor, cigarettes and beer.


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