August 20, 2016

Motivation comes from recognition

It is natural that people want to receive recognition for their commitment to the organisation or institution they work for. It is, however, unhealthy for a person to merely fancy being recognised by people in power and from above. Employers tend to use recognition in order to motivate their employees to expand their capacity for high performance.
One important thing to note in this respect is that recognition by superiors and authorities alike is prone to produce a class of self-seekers. It is recognition by peers and people around us that drives a sustainable source of motivation and morale. It is, therefore, better for leaders of all organisations to encourage a culture of peer recognition so that they can make sound judgement about employee performance. In addition, it is necessary for leaders at all levels to better leverage the skill sets of their subordinates by utilising all available resources.
Undeniably, awards in recognition of excellent performance have the potential to make people more productive and engaged in their work. There are incidents in which awards have gone to those who did not deserve recognition. This is why leaders ought to be smart enough to reward those who deserve to be rewarded based on their ability and hard work rather than on favouritism. After all, leaders are responsible for creating a decent environment in which their workers are inspired to improve their levels of performance through unbiased recognition.


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