July 06, 2017

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Mary Chapman School for the Deaf ready to provide door-to-door sign language training

Students from Mary Chapman School for the Deaf entertain the audience with dance.—Photo: Khaing Thanda Lwin
Students from Mary Chapman School for the Deaf entertain the audience with dance.—Photo: Khaing Thanda Lwin

“In order to raise sign language among people to communicate with deaf, we are planning to provide door-to-door sign language training for those enthusiasts from every organization if they invite us,” Daw Nyunt Nyunt Thein, principal of the Mary Chapman School for the Deaf, said.
Currently, trainers, students’ parents and a few numbers of locals know the sign language designed by the founder of the school who developed it in conformity with Myanmar traditions.
Plans are underway to accelerate its training for trainers programme for those interested people from the four corners of the country in the future as the country needs more teachers to train the deaf, the principal added.
It is also scheduled to add make-up, hair dressing and floral services courses next academic year. As of this academic year, the school is offering a basic computer course.
Daw Nyunt Nyunt Thein said: “We also want to send some students to workshops if someone invites us because they have a strong desire to learn machinery repair.”
The school was established in 1920 on Thantaman Street in Alone Township in Yangon by Mary Chapman. It mainly relies on individual donations and faces an imbalance between the increased number of students and rooms available. The principal is inviting donors to make contributions to extend the facilities.
There are about 400 students in this academic year, a majority of them from very poor families. Normally, the school for the deaf and hard-of-hearing children accepts the enrollment of students with an average age of 6 but sometimes the school receives late comers up to age 12. There is an average enrollment of 25 over-age students each year.
The school offers classes up to grade seven and students may pursue both a syllabus designed by the Education Ministry and vocational training. For those who wish to continue into higher education, it is managed at Basic Education High School No.3 in Dagon Township.—GNLM

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