December 13, 2017

Keep Your Axes At Bay

Logging suspended along Bago Yoma for 10 years

A man uses a chainsaw to cut teak logs in a logging camp in Myanmar in this picture taken on March 5, 2014.  Photo: Reuters
A man uses a chainsaw to cut teak logs in a logging camp in Myanmar in this picture taken on March 5, 2014. Photo: Reuters

Logging in Myanmar has ceased for this financial year with logging along the Bago Yoma mountain range ceasing for the next ten years, according to the Department of Forestry that operates under the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation.
The Department of Forestry has stated that as of 2015 the mountain range is 26 per cent forest, accounting for 9m acres.
“Upon resumption of logging activities to other areas around the country, the annual volume will be reduced,” explained U Myo Min, director of the Department of Forestry.
Once logging resumes the size and circumference of trees will be taken into account prior to logging.
“Calculations have been made as to the number of trees, whose trunk circumferences measure over the minimum set width, which will be able to be logged,” continued U Myo Min.
“Restrictions must be set on the size of trees that can be cut down. In the past, only teak trees measuring more than 7 feet and 6 inches could be logged.
This has since been changed to six feet and six inches,” said U Myo Min.
Forest conservation efforts will be conducted simultaneously with logging activities, while unofficial logging has been prohibited and logging permits for private companies will also reportedly no longer be granted. U Myo Min also said, “Trees would still be rather large even if this lower. But, since the re-growth rate of trees wouldn’t prove to be cost-effective only trees over six ft and six inches have been permitted to be logged.”—Myitmakha News Agency

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