August 19, 2016

In the service of humanity

Torrential rain has battered many parts of the country for the second time for two consecutive years, leaving hundreds of thousands of people homeless and destroying public property and transport infrastructure. Environmentalists have blamed these incidents of unprecedented flooding on the effects of forest depletion. The serious repercussions of heavy reliance on forest resources for economic development with no regard for environmental protection are still felt across the country.
Nevertheless, nobody is cold-hearted enough to stand watching the plight of the flood victims with their arms folded. Blood is thicker than water, so goes the saying. This adage highlights the importance of humanitarian aid to people affected by disaster. This signals that we need to renew our commitment to life-saving relief work to extent that children receive vaccination while sick or wounded people receive medical treatment.
All humanitarian workers should be honoured for their heroic deeds of rushing bravely to help the people in desperate need of rescue and relief. We have heard of the stories of aid workers who risked their lives for the safety and security of the people in disaster-affected areas. When it comes to rescue and relief work, the establishment of humanitarian funds should not be left out, a practice that our country still lacks.
It is undeniable that no form of discrimination as to nationality, religion and political points of view, should ever come in the way in the delivery of humanitarian assistance. The purpose of humanity is to prevent and alleviate human suffering whenever and wherever it is found. The essence of human beings is to protect the welfare of individuals without impartiality. Only then will we be able to create a caring and humane society for all humans.


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