September 22, 2017

Greater investment in education can help Myanmar secure higher ranking: HDI report

The poverty rate in Myanmar declined from 32 per cent in 2005 to 26 per cent in 2010, and many social indicators saw upward trends.

UNDP Resident Representative Ms Renata Dessallien discusses the new HDI report with reporters.
UNDP Resident Representative Ms Renata Dessallien discusses the new HDI report with reporters.

MYANMAR’s human development index value increased from 0.034 to 0.536 between 1980 and 2014, but the country still remains in the low human development category, according to the Human Development Index (HDI) report, released this this year by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
The UNDP officially submitted the 2015 HDI report under the theme of “Work for Human Development” yesterday. Since 1990, the UNDP has organised the publication of the annual report so as to raise awareness about human development worldwide.
Ms Renata Dessallien, the UNDP representative in Myanmar, said: “The country’s HDI value is expected to be promoted to the medium human development group in coming four or five years if the current development rate continues.”
The HDI report classifies countries into four groups—high, medium, low and very low.
Myanmar has a HDI value of 0.536, ranking 148 out of 188 countries and territories in the 2015 report. The UNDP official said: “The country has made steady progress in human development over the years, but it is the lowest among ASEAN countries.”
The report pointed out that the government needs to make huge investments in the education sector so as to achieve a higher ranking on the HDI list, Ms Dessallien said.
In Myanmar, the poverty rate declined from 32 per cent in 2005 to 26 per cent in 2010, and many social indicators saw upward trends, she added.
The report said the country’s life expectancy at birth increased by 10.9 years and the expected years of schooling increased by 2.6 years over a period of three decades.
“The employment to population ratio also increased from 54 per cent in 2005 to 57 per cent in 2010, but it is much lower for females and in rural areas,” she said.
According to the joint government-UNDP survey in 2010, the share of women in the non-agricultural sector was higher for the non-poor (46.7 per cent) than for the poor (40.3 per cent) and marginally lower in urban areas (44 per cent) than in rural areas (44.9 per cent).

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