October 22, 2017

Civil society to draw up PWD policy guidelines

The Wider Image: Myanmar’s war veterans left behind Kyaw Min Naing, a former soldier who lost his leg after he stepped on a landmine during fighting against ethnic armed groups, closes his barbershop outside Yangon, Myanmar May 19, 2016.
The Wider Image: Myanmar’s war veterans left behind Kyaw Min Naing, a former soldier who lost his leg after he stepped on a landmine during fighting against ethnic armed groups, closes his barbershop outside Yangon, Myanmar May 19, 2016.

CIVIL society organisations (CSOs) working for persons with disabilities (PWD) have announced policy guidelines, relating to the affairs of disabled people within Myanmar, will be released in a bid to support demands made during the five-year tenure of the incumbent government. U Nay Lin Soe, director of the the Myanmar Independent Living Initiative (MITI), says the CSO will take the lead with drawing up the policy guidelines which will prioritize the rights and entitlements of disabled persons.
“[The policy guidelines are being drawn up] to allow for precise information to be submitted to the government when working for the rights of disabled people. An archive of reports will also be submitted to the new government to enlighten them on the needs of disabled people that need to be fulfilled. The government departments concerned for carrying out certain aspects of the policy guidelines will also be referenced.” he explained.
The requests to be included in the policy guidelines relating to the affairs of disabled persons will reportedly be based upon aspects of UN’s International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, while a draft of the aforementioned guidelines will allegedly be completed during this coming July and forwarded to Hluttaw MPs and those government departments concerned.
The policy guidelines will reportedly be based around ten fundamental subject areas which will include the right of disabled persons to an education; the requirement to create job opportunities for people with disabilities; and the construction of disabled friendly access in public spaces.
“It’s good that calls [to government ] will be made with guidelines. It’ll be more effective than just making demands without information to back them up, as was the case in the past. I’d like them to add the affairs of disabled females [to the policy guidelines]; I think they should also be included. It’d be the best if desired points from all organizations could be added to the policy guidelines,” said Daw Khin Myo Naing, mother of an intellectually disabled child.
The Rights of Persons with Disabilities Law was enacted in Myanmar in July 2015, while the erstwhile Myanmar government also ratified the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities in December 2011 which stipulated fifty rights relating to equality and fair treatment in society, together with entitlement to employment and education.

 

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