June 29, 2017

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Ceasefire monitoring mechanism needs $21 million for three years

The Union-level Joint Monitoring Committee holds its third meeting at the Myanmar Peace Centre on Friday, covering a range of issues, including establishment of state-level monitoring mechanism in Shan State. — Photo: Ye Myint
The Union-level Joint Monitoring Committee holds its third meeting at the Myanmar Peace Centre on Friday, covering a range of issues, including establishment of state-level monitoring mechanism in Shan State. — Photo: Ye Myint

The monitoring process will cost an estimated US$21 million to run for three years in ceasefire areas, according to the third round of the Joint Monitoring Committee of the government, ethnic armed organizations and civil society organizations held on 7-8 January in Yangon.
As it is estimated to cost $7 to $8 million a year, we estimated the cost at around $21 million for three years, said Dr Min Zaw Oo, a programme director at Myanmar Peace Centre in meeting with the media afterwards.
Potential donors of the international community have been informed of the estimated budget for Union, region/state and regional level mechanism to deal with monitoring, verification and conflict resolution processes, the MPC’s director added.
“Now we know how to structure and implement the monitoring mechanism and how much it will cost,” he said.
Prior to receiving funds from donors, Tatmadaw is committed to working towards implementation of the terms of national ceasefire agreement, said Col Wunna Aung, a JMC secretary on behalf of Tatmadaw.
In the future, there is likely to be an allocation of funds from the defence budget of Tatmadaw for the peace process, the secretary added.
Last Friday at Myanmar Peace Centre in Yangon, the 26-member JMC briefed diplomats and officials from foreign embassies and UN agencies about works to be done by the committee and an estimated budget needed to run the monitoring process for three years.
Dr Shwe Khar, JMC’s secretary on behalf of ethnic ceasefire signatories, said that attendees to the meeting from the international community expressed their willingness to help, but who will be donors is not known yet.
“Own recourses will be used to run the functions of the committee before funding comes as the monitoring process is the important matter,” added the ethnic secretary.
JMC is the committee formed under the terms of the NCA in 30 days after the signing of ceasefire agreement by the government and eight EAOs. The committee, which is responsible for dealing with military affairs, is now pushing forward with the monitoring mechanism in Shan State, to be followed by Taninthayi and Bago regions and Kayin, Mon and Chin states.

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